Category Archives: Trinity Sunday

Trinity Sunday: East and West

“Trinity Sunday is a Western feast observed on the Sunday after Pentecost. The Orthodox churches do not observe this as a separate feast since the Holy Trinity is a major focus of the liturgical texts on Pentecost. The Orthodox churches observe All Saints Sunday the week after Pentecost; in the West, All Saints Day is celebrated on November 1.”

-from The St. James Calendar of the Christian Year

The Liturgy Letter Newsletter – Trinity Sunday 2017 (Year A)

The Liturgy Letter Newsletter – Trinity Sunday 2017 – Year A

Life in the Trinity: A Witness to New Creation

The glorious life of the Trinity created the heavens and the earth (Genesis 1:1-2:4a). God’s creation is spectacular and demonstrates that He has not abandoned His creation, but continues to sustain all life (Psalm 8). In the light of this gift, Christians are called to gratitude, peace, and love (2 Corinthians 13:11-13). We can find hope in Jesus’ promise to never leave us as we baptize, teach, and live in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit (Matthew 28:16-20).

Click the link above to read the newsletter …

Happy Trinity Sunday!

 

“And the catholic faith is this: That we worship one God in Trinity, and Trinity in Unity; Neither confounding the Persons: nor dividing the Substance. For there is one Person of the Father: another of the Son: and another of the Holy Ghost. But the Godhead of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, is all one: the Glory equal, the Majesty coeternal. Such as the Father is: such is the Son: and such is the Holy Ghost.”

— The Athanasian Creed

“There is no logical, chronological, or ontological separation of the three as they are always one. There is only distinction of the persons in the Godhead between the Father, Son, and Spirit. There’s the tension … but don’t be tempted to resolve it.”

-Scot McKnight

Holy Sonnets: Batter my heart, three-person’d God

Batter my heart, three-person’d God, for you
As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to mend;
That I may rise and stand, o’erthrow me, and bend
Your force to break, blow, burn, and make me new.
I, like an usurp’d town to another due,
Labor to admit you, but oh, to no end;
Reason, your viceroy in me, me should defend,
But is captiv’d, and proves weak or untrue.
Yet dearly I love you, and would be lov’d fain,
But am betroth’d unto your enemy;
Divorce me, untie or break that knot again,
Take me to you, imprison me, for I,
Except you enthrall me, never shall be free,
Nor ever chaste, except you ravish me.